Your Statement of Character and Our Duty

autor-Your Statement of Character and Our DutyBY JOHN H. “JJ” JONES, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, UTAH HIGHWAY PATROL ASSOCIATION

In the last issue of the Utah State Trooper magazine, I included a book titled Character, by Dr. J. Phillip London. From recent events in our nation, I thought maybe this would be a good time to bring attention to our character as individuals. For law enforcement, the fire services, U. S. military, as well as a good many other occupations, character is everything including responsibility and accountability.

Character is a unique set of moral and ethical qualities that defines what you believe in, what you stand for, and what you expect of yourself and others. Dr. London asserts that how you act on these qualities – your statement of character – will determine how far you will go; whether you will succeed or fail. Success is also distinctively defined as acting with honesty and integrity, performing to the best of your ability, and appreciating the people who helped you achieve your goals. I believe it is time for a new civil dialogue, no more excuses for the American people to have a refresher course in doing what is right and just.

In truth it is so easily inflamed, so hard to restrain and so willing to wreak havoc where peace once prevailed. The darkness of ignorance is not a reason not to read Character. Every citizen should buy this book, read this book, and retain the book in their library.

American presidents in review:

“Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.”

– Theodore Roosevelt, 26th U.S. President

“It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.”

– Harry S. Truman, 33rd U.S. President

“Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”

– John F. Kennedy, 35th U.S. President